Knowledge and Competitive Advantage in the Synthetic Dye Industry, 1850–1914: The Coevolution of Firms, Technology, and National Institutions in Great Britain, Germany, and the United States

Item Type Journal paper
Abstract

It is London 1856. William Henry Perkin serendipitously invents the first synthetic dye while he is trying to synthesize quinine, a medicine for malaria. The nineteen-year-old Perkin leaves the Royal College of Chemistry and quickly commercializes his aniline purple dye, launching the synthetic dye industry. From that time on, the industry continues to dazzle the eye with ever new and appealing dye colors. Perkin, along with entrepreneurs from Britain and France, dominates the synthetic dye industry for the next eight years. During this period, British and French firms introduce most other innovative synthetic dyes onto the market, and they hold the largest global market share.

Authors Murmann, Johann P.
Journal or Publication Title Enterprise & Society
Language English
Subjects business studies
HSG Classification contribution to scientific community
Refereed Yes
Date December 2000
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Place of Publication Cambridge
Volume 1
Number 4
Page Range 699-704
Number of Pages 5
Publisher DOI 10.1093/es/1.4.699
Official URL https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/enterprise...
Contact Email Address peter.murmann@unisg.ch
Depositing User Michele Kölbener
Date Deposited 22 Oct 2018 12:53
Last Modified 22 Oct 2018 12:53
URI: https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/publications/255428

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Citation

Murmann, Johann P. (2000) Knowledge and Competitive Advantage in the Synthetic Dye Industry, 1850–1914: The Coevolution of Firms, Technology, and National Institutions in Great Britain, Germany, and the United States. Enterprise & Society, 1 (4). 699-704.

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https://www.alexandria.unisg.ch/id/eprint/255428
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