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Strategic Management in Nonprofits

abstract The work at hand has given me the opportunity to experience and analyze change management in practice. I gained some insight into this issue in the Swiss Raiffeisen Group, a successful and exceptional enterprise in the Swiss banking sector. The insight into this complex enterprise made clear to me how effective such managerial practices, which I had rarely found in books until now, could be. These observations were challenging for me, because I could apply none of my previously learned management concepts and instruments to these practices. At first I found it difficult not only to analyze or interpret these management procedures, but even describing them posed a challenge. However, I was convinced of the effectiveness of these procedures in change processes.

Question
The question that plagued me for three years was to understand which management practices are effective in the change process of a highly decentralized enterprise. The extremely decentralized structure of the Raiffeisen Group and its legal form - it is a cooperative banking network - bore distinct parallels to NPOs. Thus another question arose: What can the NPO managers of the Raiffeisen Group learn about the effective management of change processes?
   
keywords Strategic Management; Nonprofit-Management
   
homepage http://www.clvs.unisg.ch/index.php?TPL=10107
partner
type habilitation project
status completed
start of project 2006
end of project 2008
additional informations
topics This study is based on process philosophy. A change management concept is outlined with the process paradigm. On the one hand, this can be linked to the current research on NPO management. On the other hand, it differs from the traditional western strategy concepts and has more in common with the Asian understanding of strategy (see Sun Tzu 1988). According to Clausewitz (2004, 95ff.), strategy, in the West, is generally equated with a plan. Dieser
methods I was given the opportunity to get a brief insight into the challenging day-to-day work of the management of a Swiss hospital. Thomas Hugentobler led me through the complex work of a manager, who effectively deals with the doctors, nursing staff, patients, political parties, local population and several other stake holders. The experiences gathered there are also reflected in this study, for which I would like to thank Thomas Hugentobler.

Books are expressions of real-life histories. This is no different. Its creation accompanied me for three years and opened up new horizons for me. During this time, the training of my mind was always in the foreground. From the beginning, I had to struggle for a language in which I could express what I had experienced and lived through, things that had matured earlier. It was only towards the end that the question gained momentum: how can I narrate this story so that it appears comprehensible, both to scientists as well as to practitioners. A struggle that will probably never end.
contact Urs Jaeger