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Partnering Capacity in White-Collar Public-Private Partnerships

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abstract The UK local government market has experienced a significant surge of partnership approaches to public service delivery since the start of the new millennium. As a result, a new generation of long-term partnerships has emerged which are of an unprecedented size and complexity, typically bundling a broad range of council services and transferring staff from the council to the private partner.

These white-collar PPPs deliver corporate and central support services that have been, until recently, the sole domain of local government. Because of the novelty of white-collar partnerships and the sensitivity of the services (e.g. tax collection) delivered, almost no researcher has yet accessed and explored this new phenomenon.

In general, public-private partnerships are difficult to maintain because they are large-scale complex contractual arrangements involving organisations from different sectoral backgrounds. White-collar PPPs are even more complex due to the kind and quantity of services delivered. This gives rise to the question how the ability of local authorities and private companies to maintain their partnerships
can be enhanced. This thesis develops a conceptual framework for the partnering capacity of public and private organisations in white-collar PPPs.

Based on extant literature on public-private partnerships, inter-organisational collaboration and capacity development, working propositions were derived to guide the empirical stage of the research process. An interpretive case study approach scrutinised the white-collar public-private partnership between the East
Riding of Yorkshire Council and the private company arvato. The study identified eight elements that affected the partnering capacity of public and private organisations: strategy, culture, power, communication, relationships, the contractual framework, the client-management system and the performance management system. Recommendations for practitioners are suggested by identifying 28 partnering capacity strategies in the following three phases: the
procurement phase, the settling-in phase, and the stabilisation and development phase.
   
type thesis (Deutsch)
   
keywords Outsourcing, Public-Private Partnership
   
university St. Gallen
evaluator Prof. Dr. Kuno Schedler, Prof. Dr. Isabella Proeller
publisher elektronische Publikation
date of appearance 2009
citation Walther, M. (2009). Partnering Capacity in White-Collar Public-Private Partnerships, St. Gallen, Thesis: elektronische Publikation.