University of St.Gallen
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Productive organizational energy as a mediator in the contextual ambidexterity-performances relation

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abstract Contextual ambidexterity has been proposed to be crucial for company performance. Yet, only little is known about how contextual ambidexterity impacts firm performance. Based on prior research, we propose contextual ambidexterity to drive productive organizational energy toward the organizational overarching goals which in turn will positively impact firm performance. Our results support all four hypotheses by showing (a) contextual ambidexterity to facilitate firm performance, (b) contextual ambidexterity to positively impact productive organizational energy, (c) productive organizational energy to fosters firm performance, and ultimately (d) productive organizational energy acting as a partial mediator in the positive relation between contextual ambidexterity and firm performance. We achieved these results with a sample containing 118 German small to medium sized organizations. All focal variables were collected from different sources. In total our sample contains answers from 4452 employees, 355 top management team members, and 118 HR executives.
   
type conference paper (English)
   
keywords Contextual Ambidexterity, Productive Organizational Energy, Organizational Performance
   
name of conference 70th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management (Montreal, Kanada)
date of conference 6-8-2010
title of proceedings Dare to Care: Passion & Compassion in Management Practice & Research
volume / edition Paper Session 1150
publisher Academy of Management (New York)
review double-blind review
   
citation Schudy, C., & Bruch, H. (2010). Productive organizational energy as a mediator in the contextual ambidexterity-performances relation. In Dare to Care: Passion & Compassion in Management Practice & Research, Paper Session 1150. New York: Academy of Management.