Now showing 1 - 10 of 13
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How family CEOs affect employees’ feelings and behaviors: A study on positive emotions

2022-03-07 , Kammerlander, Nadine , Menges, Jochen , Herhausen, Dennis , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Bruch, Heike

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The impact of family management on employee well-being: A multilevel study

2017-01 , Kammerlander, Nadine , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Herhausen, Dennis

Non-family employees are an important resource in family firms; therefore, understanding their well-being is of utmost relevance for management theory. Integrating leadership theory into family business research, we draw from the emotional contagion and person-organization fit theories and argue that employee well-being in terms of organizational-level affective climate and individual-level job satisfaction is higher in firms managed by a family CEO. Moreover, we hypothesize that this relationship becomes stronger with higher levels of CEO transformational leadership and weaker with increasing CEO tenure. We test our hypotheses using a large-scale, multilevel dataset comprising 2,246 direct reports of the respective CEO and 41,531 employees from 497 family- and non-family-managed firms. By applying multilevel modeling, we found support for our proposed hypotheses. Post-hoc tests reveal that the positive effect of family management is particularly strong in first generation family firms. This article contributes to research on leadership and on family firms and advances the evidence-based debate about employees in those firms.

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A self-based trickle-down model of work meaningfulness

2017-05-04 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Raes, Anneloes , Herhausen, Dennis , Bruch, Heike , Kark, Ronit

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Trickle down effects of work meaningfulness through visionary leadership

2015-08-07 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Raes, Anneloes , Herhausen, Dennis , Bruch, Heike

Experiencing work as meaningful benefits both individuals and organizations. While prior research has indicated that leaders may shape followers’ work meaningfulness, little is known about the role of leaders’ own work meaningfulness in this process. Drawing from self-concept based theory and interpersonal sensemaking processes, we argue that work meaningfulness trickles down from strategic leaders to mid-level leaders to employees through visionary leadership. Additionally, we propose that organizational tenure shapes this transfer in such a way that leaders’ influence is higher for followers new to the organization. Finally, we expect work meaningfulness to positively relate to important behavioral outcomes across different hierarchies. In order to test the derived hypotheses, we conducted two multilevel studies among 54 CEOs and 267 mid-level managers (Study 1), and 39 mid-level leaders and 173 employees (Study 2). Using multilevel structural equation modeling, our results confirmed most hypotheses. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

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Start with why: the transfer of work meaningfulness from leaders to followers and the role of dyadic tenure

2022 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Raes, Anneloes , Herhausen, Dennis , Kark, R. , Bruch, Heike

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Mitigating the dark side of contextual ambidexterity: Consequences for employee well-being.

2023-03-30 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Hughes, Mathew , Herhausen, Dennis , Morgan, Robert , Bruch, Heike

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Leading With Meaning: How And When Leader Work Meaningfulness Transfers To Followers

2016-01-07 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Raes, Anneloes , Herhausen, Dennis , Bruch, Heike

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Face Forward: How Employees’ Digital Presence on Service Websites Affects Customer Perceptions of Website and Employee Service Quality

2020-07-15 , Herhausen, Dennis , Emrich, Oliver , Grewal, Dhruv , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Schögel, Marcus

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The impact of family management on employee well-being: A multilevel study

2017-08-07 , Kammerlander, Nadine , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Herhausen, Dennis

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The Effect of Internal versus External Communication on Organizational Identification

2015-08-07 , Herhausen, Dennis , Henkel, Sven , Kipfelsberger, Petra

This research examines the interplay of internal versus external communication and employees’ distance to headquarters on employees’ organizational identification. Drawing from construal-level theory and social identity theory, the authors theoretically argue that employees’ psychological distance to headquarters determines the effect of organizational communication measures on employees’ organizational identification. In particular, the degree of construal fit between concreteness versus abstractness of the communication and employees’ psychological distance to headquarters might influence whether internal or external communication will lead to higher organizational identification. Hypotheses were tested via two multilevel field studies comprising the responses of 1,102 employees from an industrial service firm and a retail firm. Study results support the proposed model: Internal communication is superior to target employees with low psychological distance while external communication is superior to target employees with high psychological distance to headquarters. Important theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.