Now showing 1 - 10 of 70
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How family CEOs affect employees’ feelings and behaviors: A study on positive emotions

2022-03-07 , Kammerlander, Nadine , Menges, Jochen , Herhausen, Dennis , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Bruch, Heike

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Loyalty Formation for Different Customer Journey Segments

2019 , Herhausen, Dennis , Kleinlercher, Kristina , Verhoef, Peter , Emrich, Oliver , Rudolph, Thomas

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Integrating Bricks with Clicks : Retailer-Level and Channel-Level Outcomes of Online-Offline Channel Integration

2015-10-20 , Herhausen, Dennis , Binder, Jochen , Schögel, Marcus , Herrmann, Andreas

This research examines the impact of online-offline channel integration (OI), defined as integrating access to and knowledge about the offline channel into an online channel. Although channel integration has been acknowledged as a promising strategy for retailers, its effects on customer reactions towards retailers and across different channels remain unclear. Drawing on technology adoption research and diffusion theory, the authors conceptualize a theoretical model where perceived service quality and perceived risk of the Internet store mediate the impact of OI while the Internet shopping experience of customers moderates the impact of OI. The authors then test for the indirect, conditional effects of OI on search intentions, purchase intentions and willingness to pay. Importantly, they differentiate between retailer-level and channel-level effects, thereby controlling for interdependencies between different channels. The results of three studies provide converging evidence and show that OI leads to a competitive advantage and channel synergies rather than channel cannibalization. These findings have direct implications for marketers and retailers interested in understanding whether and how integrating different channels affects customer outcomes.

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High performance at high cost: The unanticipated health consequence of contextual ambidexterity

2023-01-04 , KIPFELSBERGER, PETRA , Bruch, Heike , Herhausen, Dennis , Hughes, Mathew , Morgan, Robert

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Start with why: the transfer of work meaningfulness from leaders to followers and the role of dyadic tenure

2022 , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Raes, Anneloes , Herhausen, Dennis , Kark, R. , Bruch, Heike

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Detecting, Preventing, and Mitigating Online Firestorms in Brand Communities

2019 , Herhausen, Dennis , Ludwig, Stephan , Grewal, Dhruv , Wulf, Jochen , Schögel, Marcus

Online firestorms pose severe threats to online brand communities. Any negative electronic word of mouth (eWOM) has the potential to become an online firestorm, yet not every post does, so finding ways to detect and respond to negative eWOM constitutes a critical managerial priority. The authors develop a comprehensive framework that integrates different drivers of negative eWOM and the response approaches that firms use to engage in and disengage from online conversations with complaining customers. A text-mining study of negative eWOM demonstrates distinct impacts of high and low arousal emotions, structural tie strength, and linguistic style match (between sender and brand community) on firestorm potential. The firm’s response must be tailored to the intensity of arousal in the negative eWOM to limit the virality of potential online firestorms. The impact of initiated firestorms can be mitigated by distinct firm responses over time, and the effectiveness of different disengagement approaches also varies with their timing. For managers, these insights provide guidance on how to detect and reduce the virality of online firestorms.

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A Meta Analysis of the Antecedents and Consequences of Strategic Flexibility

2014-08-01 , Herhausen, Dennis , Morgan, Robert E. , Volberda, Henk W.

It is axiomatic that strategic flexibility is a key success factor in generating competitive advantage. Despite this maxim, often peddled in the normative literature, empirical studies have produced inconsistent results for the strength and direction of this relationship. We synthesize these results and provide empirical support for a general, moderate, and positive effect of strategic flexibility on firm performance. Moreover, we find that strategic flexibility indirectly affects financial performance through its positive effects on innovation capability and superior market position, and that strategic flexibility has a negative direct effect on financial performance. Importantly, the meta-analytic evidence also indicates that the strategic flexibility-performance relationship depends on measurement methods, the research context, and certain environmental characteristics. Exploratory analyses regarding the antecedents of strategic flexibility reveal many meaningful differences to the predominant expectations in prior research. Overall, our results provide the necessary nuance to discerning the specific antecedent and consequential effects of strategic flexibility, thereby providing valuable implications for managers, and outlining a research agenda for future inquiries.

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Face Forward: How Employees’ Digital Presence on Service Websites Affects Customer Perceptions of Website and Employee Service Quality

2020-07-15 , Herhausen, Dennis , Emrich, Oliver , Grewal, Dhruv , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Schögel, Marcus

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The impact of family management on employee well-being: A multilevel study

2017-01 , Kammerlander, Nadine , Kipfelsberger, Petra , Herhausen, Dennis

Non-family employees are an important resource in family firms; therefore, understanding their well-being is of utmost relevance for management theory. Integrating leadership theory into family business research, we draw from the emotional contagion and person-organization fit theories and argue that employee well-being in terms of organizational-level affective climate and individual-level job satisfaction is higher in firms managed by a family CEO. Moreover, we hypothesize that this relationship becomes stronger with higher levels of CEO transformational leadership and weaker with increasing CEO tenure. We test our hypotheses using a large-scale, multilevel dataset comprising 2,246 direct reports of the respective CEO and 41,531 employees from 497 family- and non-family-managed firms. By applying multilevel modeling, we found support for our proposed hypotheses. Post-hoc tests reveal that the positive effect of family management is particularly strong in first generation family firms. This article contributes to research on leadership and on family firms and advances the evidence-based debate about employees in those firms.

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Preventing Firestorms in Social Media. 2018. - Interactive Marketing Research Conference. - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

, Herhausen, Dennis , Ludwig, Stephan , Wulf, Jochen , Grewal, Dhruv , Schögel, Marcus