Now showing 1 - 10 of 16
  • Publication
    MANY ROADS TO SUCCESS: BROADENING OUR VIEWS OF ACADEMIC CAREER PATHS AND ADVICE
    ( 2024)
    Beth Livingston
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    A. K. Ward
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    Allison S. Gabriel
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    Joanna T. Campbell
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    Emily Block
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    Kimberly French
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    Rachel Frieder
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    Annika Hillebrandt
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    Jia (Jasmine) Hu
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    Kristen P. Jones
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    Nina M. Junker
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    Ashley Mandeville
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    Sarah Otner
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    Amanda S. Patel
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    Samantha Paustian-underdahl
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    Manuela Priesemuth
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    Kristen M. Shockley
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    Mindy Shoss
    Advice is often given to junior scholars in the field of organization science to ostensibly facilitate their career success. In this commentary, we discuss insights from 19 elite scholars (i.e., Fellows and top journal editors) about the advice they received—and often, did not follow—throughout their careers. We highlight some of the pitfalls from the current, all-too-common and often singular advice given to junior scholars while also adding necessary nuance to the requirements to achieve success in our field. We conclude with advice on how to give better advice, thereby more equitably encouraging a new generation of increasingly diverse researchers and future professors.
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  • Publication
    Research: When Employees Identify with Their Company, They’re Less Likely to Recognize Gender Discrimination
    ( 2024-05-03) ;
    Tyler Okimoto
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    Xinxin Li
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    Brooke Gazdag
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    Michelle Ryan
    Identifying as an organizational member — or feeling a strong sense of attachment to the organization — is generally a positive thing for employees and employers. But our research on workplace incivility and mistreatment shows that it can also shape when — and if — employees recognize and respond to subtle forms of discrimination against women at work. Evidence shows that leaders, as well as employees, play a key role in identifying and remedying gender discrimination in all its forms. If the goal is to proactively address gender discrimination in the workplace and encourage leaders and workers to remove their rose-colored glasses, this article offers a few suggestions.
  • Publication
    How identity impacts bystander responses to workplace mistreatment
    ( 2023) ;
    Tyler Okimoto
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    Xinxin Li
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    Brooke Gazdag
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    Michelle Ryan
    Integrating a social identity approach with Cortina’s (2008) theorizing about selective incivility as modern discrimination, we examine how identification—with an organization, with one’s gender, and as a feminist—shapes bystanders’ interpretations and responses to witnessed incivility (i.e., interpersonal acts of disrespect) and selective incivility (i.e., incivility motivated by targets’ social group membership) towards women at work. We propose that bystanders with stronger organizational identification are less likely to perceive incivility towards female colleagues as discrimination and intervene, but female bystanders with stronger gender identification are more likely to do so. Results from two-wave field data in a cross-lagged panel design (Study 1, N = 336) showed that organizational identification negatively predicted observed selective incivility one year later but revealed no evidence of an effect of female bystanders’ gender identification. We replicated and extended these results with a vignette experiment (Study 2, N = 410) and an experimental recall study (Study 3, N = 504). Findings revealed a “dark side” of organizational identification: strongly identified bystanders were less likely to perceive incivility as discrimination, but there were again no effects of women’s gender identification. Study 3 also showed that bystander feminist identification increased intervention via perceived discrimination. These results raise doubts that female bystanders are more sensitive to recognizing other women’s mistreatment as discrimination, but more strongly identified feminists (male or female) were more likely to intervene. Although strongly organizationally identified bystanders were more likely to overlook women’s mistreatment, they were also more likely to intervene once discrimination was apparent.
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    Scopus© Citations 3
  • Publication
    How to foster more sustinable inclusion (when leaders aren't inclusive)
    ( 2024-05-03) ; ;
    Sanne Feenstra
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    David Cheng
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    Niels Van Quaquebeke
    Research and practice have focused on if and how leaders can be more inclusive towards their followers and teams. However, in practice, we know that--despite trainings, executive education, etc.--some leaders still cannot (or will not) include. Here, we review the individual and contextual level reasons for this while also highlighting a potential path forward. By theoretically exploring the dynamic, helical process through which followers can also upwardly influence their leaders and their leaders' inclusion, we formulate a way through which followers can inspire more sustainable inclusion over time.
  • Publication
    Diversity in Elite Leadership: Global Effects, New Outcome Variables, and Deep Dives Into Processes
    ( 2023)
    Alison M. Konrad
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    Diana Bilimoria
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    Cynthia E. Clark
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    Ryan Miller
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    Martha L. Maznevski
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    Karlygash Assylkhan
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    Colin Birkhead
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  • Publication
    Friend vs. fiend? A review of follower humor
    ( 2023) ; ;
    Petra Schmid
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    Niels Van Quaquebeke
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    Humor is prolific across our professional lives. Most humor research in organizations has focused on leaders’ humor, showing that more humorous leaders are better leaders. But a key feature of professional contexts—hierarchy—deeply shapes the nature and effects of humor, particularly for understudied groups: followers and those who are relatively lower in the hierarchy. In this interdisciplinary review of upward humor, we consolidate key themes across theories and literatures to propose an overarching model of behavioral humor while also parsimoniously organizing key outcomes along agency and communality. So, as alluded in our title, upwardly humorous employees can be viewed as friend—or fiend—generating more variable reactions than leaders due to their relatively lower position in the hierarchy.
  • Publication
    Advancing Gender Equity and Diversity in the Workplace: The Role of Allyship and Leadership
    ( 2023)
    Lyubykh, Zhanna
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    Mercer, Danielle
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    Megan Marie Walsh
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    Agnihotri, Nikita
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    Jasmien Khattab
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    Yang Yongkang
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    Li Jia
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    Anne Nederveen Pieterse
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    Natalya Alonso
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    Nick Turner
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    Cara-lynn Scheuer
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    Megan Marie Walsh
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    Catherine Loughlin
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    Shasanka Chalise
    Addressing inequity is a pressing societal concern. For example, numerous studies have provided consistent evidence for gender inequities as well as barriers and adverse workplace experiences women face. In this symposium, we aim to shed light on factors that can help accelerate social progress in the domain of gender and leadership. The papers in this symposium showcase how leaders can effectively facilitate women’s leadership advancement (Bajet Mestre & Gloor; Lyubykh, Alonso, & Turner) and help manage team diversity (Yang, Li, van Knippenberg, & Pieterse), offer a psychometrically robust scale to measure leader allyship (Mercer et al.), and explore how female leaders navigate tensions between gender expectations and leadership expectations (Khattab & Hentschel). We will conclude with a discussion (Hideg) to suggest directions for future research a well as takeaways for leaders, organizations, and policymakers.
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  • Publication
    Flirting, jokes, and compliments: How female leaders shape a key source of entrepreneurial well-being
    ( 2023) ; ;
    Amanda Shantz
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    Philipp Sieger
    Entrepreneurship is an intensely stressful journey that can undermine entrepreneurial well-being. While most research on entrepreneurial well-being has focused on individual characteristics as key antecedents, we examine the role of an overlooked but highly prevalent intra-team social experience on entrepreneur well-being: Social Sexual Behavior (SSB). To do so, we draw on interaction ritual theory to explain the mixed evidence of how these non-work-related behaviors with a sexual component (e.g., flirting, joking, and complimenting on physical appearances) affect worker well-being. That is, when SSB is frequent and part of the interaction ritual (i.e., accepted forms of behavior incorporated into scripted routine interactions that facilitates organizing social relations), SSB is positively associated with well-being. In contrast, if SSB is rare and not accepted as an interaction ritual, SSB is negatively associated with well-being, because SSB is flagged as a negative behavior that deviates from accepted forms of behavior and hinders social relations. By facilitating or hindering social relations, the frequency of experienced SSB at work predicts receiver well-being according to a U-shaped function. But given leaders’ critical influence on team norms and rituals, we examine how leaders shape SSB’s effects on entrepreneurial well-being and if this differs by leader gender. As female (vs. male) leaders may be more responsive to gendered interaction dynamics like SSB, we propose a moderating effect of female leadership on the previously hypothesized U-shaped effect of SSB on receiver well-being, such that the U-shape is more pronounced with greater shares of female leaders. Finally, because men may feel more negative emotions in post-#MeToo era mixed-gender interactions—perhaps especially male employees with female leaders—anxiety may be amplified (or mitigated) when female leaders problematize (or accommodate) SSB, such that the moderating effect of the share of female leaders on receiver well-being is stronger for male (vs. female) receivers. Analyses of an international sample of entrepreneurs from the 2018 GUESSS dataset (n=11,177) generally support our theorizing. A pair of experiments are also planned to causally replicate and extend these results. This research contributes to the entrepreneurship, leadership, and diversity literatures by clarifying the mixed effects of SSB on well-being in the literature with more precise, non-linear theorizing tested in the masculine context of entrepreneurship. This research also fits well with the conference theme by examining how leaders shape follower well-being, represented by co-owners and founders (respectively).
  • Publication
    Building Diverse and Inclusive Social Networks: New Theories and Empirical Evidence
    ( 2023) ; ;
    Raina Brands
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    Ko Kuwabara
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    Paul Ingram
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    Tatiana Lluent
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    Gianluca Carnabuci
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    Eugenia Bajet Mestre
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    Isabelle Engeler
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    Meredith Woehler
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    Julia Stevenson-street
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    Courtney Hart
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