Now showing 1 - 10 of 353
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Government-university collaboration on smart city and smart government projects: What are the success factors?

2024-01 , Ali Asker Guenduez , Ruth Frischknecht , Sebastian Frowein , Kuno Schedler

Despite the widespread practice of cooperation between governments and universities on smart city and smart government projects, the factors influencing this cooperation are not well known. We explore government-university collaboration to illuminate four potential determinants of success in such projects: output, institutional, relationship, and framework factors. Using mixed methods, including a theoretically informed crisp-set qualitative comparative analysis methodology and thematic analysis of interviews and secondary data, we identify the causal relationships among these determinants and perceived success of government-university collaboration on smart city and smart government projects. We find that for a collaboration to be considered successful, all of these factors must be present and positive. In contrast, a negative assessment of even one of these factors is sufficient to evaluate the collaboration as unsuccessful.

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Smart criminal justice: Phenomena and normative requirements

2021-10-20 , Simmler, Monika , Canova, Giulia , Schedler, Kuno

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How smart can government be? Exploring barriers to the adoption of smart government

2019 , Schedler, Kuno , Guenduez, Ali A. , Frischknecht, Ruth

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Smart Government Success Factors

2018-12 , Guenduez, Ali A. , Singler, Sebastian , Tomczak, Tobias , Schedler, Kuno , Oberli, Moritz

Smart information and communication technologies are finding their way into public administration. Today, there are numerous initiatives in the public sector, promising a new model for the public services: smart government. In this article, we seek to identify success factors for smart government initiatives. We provide a selected review of the current literature on the motivations, goals, and processes behind smart government so as to provide a conceptual and analytical basis for the analysis. Based on desk research, interviews, and workshops, our qualitative analysis reveals institutional (political commitment, clear governance, legal agility, digital awareness, and IT infrastructure), organizational (structure and processes, capabilities, values, and human resources), and leadership/strategy success factors that must be considered when implementing smart government initiatives. We discuss our findings and conclude by emphasizing the limitations as well as implications for praxis and future research.

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The role of trust in the adoption of cooperative arrangement types in e-credentials markets

2023 , Guenduez, Ali Asker , Mettler, Tobias , Schedler, Kuno

The interest in digital identities has increased considerably in academia and practice in recent years. This can be seen by the many electronic identity projects worldwide and the numerous published studies that provide insightful narratives and descriptive case findings about success factors and barriers to the adoption of national authentication infrastructures. In this paper, we take a closer look to the role of trust on the design and implementation of a nation-wide e-credential market. We argue that trust in political and economic institutions can be an important factor to explain differences in the chosen cooperative arrangement which can range from monopolistic, purely state-controlled e-credential markets, to polypolistic, decentralized e-credential markets where also private vendors offer state recognized e-ID on their own or in partnership with the government. Following an inductive reasoning process, we develop three testable propositions which may inspire further empirical research and offer practitioners a new angle to rethink e-credential markets in the light of citizen trust in political and economic institutions.

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Legitimizing the Smart City Idea: The Case of the #Smarthalle

2020-11-09 , Frischknecht, Ruth , Schedler, Kuno , Gündüz, Ali Asker

Many cities are pursuing the goal of becoming a smart city which has far-reaching consequences for the city and its stakeholders. A successful implementation of these smart city initiatives requires a broad legitimacy base. This poses a challenge for cities as creating legitimacy for new ideas is by no means easy. In this article, we explore how a city administration tries to influence the legitimacy of an idea like that of a smart city. Based on a case study about the #Smarthalle, a project of the city of St. Gallen different legitimization strategies are presented. The results show that legitimization efforts are primarily directed at citizens and administrative staff. The analysis reveals that creating a vision, making the idea tangible and mobilizing allies are key strategies for legitimizing smart city initiatives and related projects. onsequently, the #Smarthalle was designed as a place to exchange ideas, experience smart technologies and directly connect the administration and the citizens.

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Bürgerinteraktionen in der Smart City: Eine Kategorisierung

2019 , Tomczak, Tobias , Andermatt, Kevin , Schedler, Kuno

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Smart criminal justice: exploring the use of algorithms in the Swiss criminal justice system

2022-03-14 , Simmler, Monika , Brunner, Simone , Canova, Giulia , Schedler, Kuno

In the digital age, the use of advanced technology is becoming a new paradigm in police work, criminal justice, and the penal system. Algorithms promise to predict delinquent behaviour, identify potentially dangerous persons, and support crime investigation. Algorithm-based applications are often deployed in this context, laying the groundwork for a ‘smart criminal justice’. In this qualitative study based on 32 interviews with criminal justice and police officials, we explore the reasons why and extent to which such a smart criminal justice system has already been established in Switzerland, and the benefits perceived by users. Drawing upon this research, we address the spread, application, technical background, institutional implementation, and psychological aspects of the use of algorithms in the criminal justice system. We find that the Swiss criminal justice system is already significantly shaped by algorithms, a change motivated by political expectations and demands for efficiency. Until now, algorithms have only been used at a low level of automation and technical complexity and the levels of benefit perceived vary. This study also identifies the need for critical evaluation and research-based optimization of the implementation of advanced technology. Societal implications, as well as the legal foundations of the use of algorithms, are often insufficiently taken into account. By discussing the main challenges to and issues with algorithm use in this field, this work lays the foundation for further research and debate regarding how to guarantee that ‘smart’ criminal justice is actually carried out smartly.

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Technological frames in public administration: What do public managers think of big data?

2020-01 , Guenduez, Ali A. , Mettler, Tobias , Schedler, Kuno

Being among the largest creators and gatherers of data in many countries, public administrations are looking for ways to harness big data technology. However, the de facto uses of big data in the public sector remain very limited. Despite numerous studies aiming to clarify the term big data, for many public managers, it remains unclear what this technology does and does not offer public administration. Using the concept of technological frames, we explore the assumptions, expectations, and understandings that public managers possess in order to interpret and make sense of big data. We identify nine big data frames, ranging from inward-oriented techno-enthusiasts to outward-oriented techno-skeptics, each of which characterizes public managers' specific viewpoints relating to the introduction of big data in public administrations. Our findings highlight inconsistencies between different perceptions and reveal widespread skepticism among public managers, helping better understand why the de facto uses of big data in the public sector remain very limited.

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Digitalisierung der Medizin: Konsequenzen für die Ausbildung

2018-10 , Buhmann, Joachim , Felix, Juerg , Gächter, Thomas , Kowatsch, Tobias , Lehmann, Roger , von Lutterotti, Nicola , Schedler, Kuno , Steurer, Johann , Wolfrum, Christian