Now showing 1 - 10 of 220
  • Publication
    State-of-the-Art Review on Destination Marketing and Destination Management
    ( 2023) ; ;
    Alan Fyall
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    Choi, Hwan-Suk Chris
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    Marion Joppe
    This article presents a narrative perspective review of the state-of-the-art of destination marketing and management. The past 15 years of developments, stretching from technological advances enabling methodological progress and new consumer behavior to climate, health, and financial crises, require a reassessment of previous academic contributions and current practices. Referring back to the social origins of destinations, this article conceptualizes destinations as a heterogeneous space of flows and proposes future research linked to tourist demand and tourism supply, sustainability and resilience, technological shifts, and institutions. Finally, six broader streams of conversations suggest how to advance the marketing and management of destinations related to a destination ontology grounded in flows, with a focus on processes and action, stewardship and collaboration, resilient destinations, transient and permanent residents, as well as new instrumental technologies and augmented experiences.
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  • Publication
    The 2022 St. Gallen Consensus on Advances in Destination Management
    This article presents the 2022 Consensus on Advances in Destination Management, a research agenda for destination marketing and management. Like its predecessors, this agenda is grounded in the collaborative consensus discourse methodology. To identify relevant avenues for future research, the consensus draws on three days of structured interactions among scholarly and industry experts invested in advancing the research and practice of destination marketing and management for sustainable development of tourist destinations at the 5th Advances in Destination Management Forum in Kalmar, Sweden. The consensus details avenues for further research in five key areas that relate to (1) the role and future of DMOs, (2) tourism policy and governance issues, (3) advancing destination resilience and sustainability, (4) the measurement and tracking of visitor flows, and (5) destination development in emergent destinations.
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  • Publication
    Logics behind evading overnight taxes: a configurational analysis
    (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2020-01-13) ; ;
    Overnight taxes are controversial. They affect tourists’ consumption behavior and hotels’ profits. This potentially generates undesirable industry practices such as underreporting overnights to evade overnight taxes. The aim of the paper is to understand the conditions and outcomes of underreporting. This is important because underreporting affects destinations’ tax income, which in turn may have further effects on tourismor other public services.
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  • Publication
    Visitor flows, trajectories and corridors: Planning and designing places from the traveler's point of view
    Recent research underlines the importance of understanding the tourist destination as a demand-driven construct. Visitors activate different configurations of supply elements that produce a complex and dynamic fabric referred to as a space of flows. Today, we have the means to understand how these flows shape the evolution and gestalt of tourist places. This article proposes a new framework combining three concepts and related foundational theories: visitor flows, trajectories, and corridors. In tandem, they describe how tourism manifests itself in space and time. Trip decision, trip execution, and tourist performance unfold through social mechanisms generating the totality of visitor flows. Stakeholders must understand how visitor flows in their destinations emerge and evolve in order to decide on specific design interventions.
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    Scopus© Citations 27
  • Publication
    Transferring concepts and Tools from other fields to the Tourist destination: A critical viewpoint focusing on the lifecycle concept
    (Elsevier, 2019-10-17)
    The tourist destination lifecycle is one of the main concepts that has engaged researchers and practitioners for decades. Butler's tourist area life cycle (TALC) serves as the major reference (Butler, 1980). In a recent posting on the TRINET discussion forum, Prof. Bob McKercher of Hong Kong Polytechnic University questioned to what extent the entire lifecycle of destinations really shows the typical ‘s’-shape curve and whether there are alternative models. In addition, he raised the question of how destination management or marketing organizations (DMOs) could play a strategic role in shaping the lifecycle curve of tourist destinations. The precise question was posed on October 31, 2018 as follows: Destinations have specific lifecycle phases that can be plotted whenever you do a cross sectional, single time frame study, but, is it possible to map its entire lifecycle confidently, given how many various inputs there {sic} to the system? Plog, Butler, etc. say yes, although Plog says the lifecycle is finite unless there is an ‘earthquake’, while Butler wrote about evolution. Complexity says maybe. Prideaux and Choy talk about how it is scalloped shaped with innovations – technology, marketing, etc. pushing destinations to new phases. DMOs say no and strive to revitalize, develop or maintain. So the issue is that you can do one off analyses and say the destination is in xyz stage. But has anyone been able to confidently map out the entire lifecycle???? Can it even be done or is destination life path one of continuous fluctuation that can be plotted at single points in time, but cannot be aggregated to produce a ‘lifecycle’? This paper is inspired by McKercher's conundrum because it is relevant and still current. Indeed, there is increasing interest in DMOs and their impact as well as an increasing amount of research in the field of destination marketing and management, not least on account of the rising importance of this journal. In addition, assuming that the tourist destination is an entity, one could intuitively relate to the lifecycle concept for the purpose of research, development, marketing and management. This is a modified and extended version of the reply I posted on TRINET on November 2, 2018. 2. Problem and aim of the paper
  • Publication
    Why DMOs and Tourism Organizations Do not Really 'Get/Attract Visitors': Uncovering the Truth behind a Cargo Cult.
    The term "getting visitors" is a colloquial expression of the assumption that tourist organizations of all sorts (DMOs) (Destination Marketing/Management Organizations) can attract new or additional visitors to a destination especially by using communication tools. In this article, we use well-founded scientific studies, critical reasoning, and practical considerations to argue that this assumption rarely holds. Eleven selected myths surrounding the practice of DMOs are critically examined and characterized as a cargo cult. It turns out that huge effort is put into creating extremely little added value in terms of additional visitors. The consequences, especially for today's "marketing-oriented" DMOs, are far-reaching. DMOs still have legitimacy. But this must be based on the original rationale behind DMOs, specifically as a solution to instances of market failure in public spaces.
  • Publication
    Project networks and the reputation in a community destination: Proof of the missing link
    (Elsevier, 2019)
    Buffa, Federica
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    Martini, Umberto
    This study analyses the influence of project networks (salient actors involved in the creation of innovative products) on the reputation network (salient actors able to lead the destination in the future) in a community destination. The research builds on a case study conducted in a leading Alpine destination. Key stakeholders involved in the local tourism offer were interviewed using snowball sampling. A quali-quantitative approach and social network analysis were applied to: (a) identify the destination's most innovative products; (b) identify the key players behind each innovative product and reconstruct its project network; (c) reconstruct the reputation network; and (d) assess the influence of the project networks on the reputation network. The analysis was carried out using a multiple regression quadratic assignment procedure (MR-QAP). It shows the influence of each project network on the reputation network and highlights both that the latter is a consequence of the former and the effectiveness of collaborative innovation. Each project, based on shared goals, contributes significantly to the reputation network. The research contributes to deepening the current debate on the influence of project networks on the reputation network in a community destination, and it is to be hoped that the establishment of this link can draw together two–currently parallel–research streams on tourism (one on innovation, the other on stakeholder salience and reputation in community destinations).
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    Scopus© Citations 15
  • Publication
    A business model typology for destination management organizations
    (Emerald, 2019-11-27) ; ;
    Gruenig, Rouven
    Purpose – The need and legitimacy of DMOs are increasingly questioned. Still, the tourism literature provides little advice on how DMOs change and finance their activities for the benefit of their destination given contextual change. This conceptual article, contributes to filling this gap. We do so by proposing a typology of business models for destination management organizations. Design/methodology/approach – With the help of typological reasoning, we develop a new framework of DMO business model ideal types. To this end, we draw on extant literature on business model typologies and identify key dimensions of DMO business models from the tourism literature. Findings – The challenges DMOs face, as discussed in the tourism literature, relate to both ends of its business model: On the one end, the value creation side, the perceived value of the activities they traditionally peruse has been declining; on the other end, the value capture side, revenue streams are less plentiful or attached to more extensive demands. Based on two dimensions, configurational complexity and perceived control, we identify four distinct ideal types of DMO business models: the destination factory, the destination service center, the value orchestrator, and the value enabler. Originality/value – We outline a “traditional” DMO business model that stands in contrast to existing DMO classifications and that relates DMO challenges to the business model concept. The typology provides an integrated description of how DMO business models may be positioned to create and capture value for the organization and the destination(s) is serves. The ideal types point to important interdependencies of specific business model design choices.
    Scopus© Citations 36
  • Publication
    Chance meetings, the destination paradox, and the social origins of travel – Predicting traveler’s whereabouts?
    Have you ever unexpectedly met someone you already knew in a remote travel destination? Many people have or will at least a couple times in their travel biography. In this article, we theorize how such chance meetings help better understand the socially embedded nature of travel behavior and choice. We validate the underlying assumptions with an exploratory empirical study. By conceptualizing chance meetings and connecting them with social network theory, we get closer to predicting where people precisely travel and what activities they engage in at particular points in time. This socially embedded perspective transcends the importance of attractions and activities as object of reference between traveler and place. Broadly, these findings contribute to the discussion on the social origins of travel and on how choices are taken in travel.
    Scopus© Citations 5
  • Publication
    The SOMOAR operationalization: a holistic concept to travel decision modelling
    (Emerald Publishing Limited, 2018-12-15) ;
    Luo, Jieqing
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    Most state-of-the-art approaches for the analysis of the process of travel decision-making follow Woodworth’s neo-behaviouristic S–R (stimulus–response) or S–O–R (stimulus–organism–response) model. However, within this model, scholars primarily focus on the S–R relationship, investigating specific decisions by describing or explaining an outcome as the result of an input of several stimuli. There is a lack of investigation into the “O” dimension of the S–O–R model. This paper aims to contribute towards closing of this gap by conceptually and holistically expanding existing models with new perspectives and components.
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