Now showing 1 - 10 of 14
  • Publication
    A Conceptual Framework for Analysing Enterprise Engineering Methodologies
    (Ges. für Informatik, 2016) ; ; ;
    Manfred, Reichert
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    Strecker, Stefan
    For the design and engineering of enterprises, several methodologies are available that successfully address certain aspects of design problems in enterprises or certain domains. In real-world design problems it is essential to choose the right means to reach the desired ends. Often it is not apparent which methodology is best chosen in order to reach desired ends. Additionally, real-world design problems often require several such methodologies to be combined because multiple aspects have to be covered and/or the problem combines characteristics of several domains. In order to allow for a systematically understanding and comparison of methodologies and for a facilitation of their composition (if necessary), we propose a general conceptual framework. The framework allows analysing the essential concepts and constituent parts of enterprise engineering methodologies. The resulting analysis supports decisions making concerning which methodology or which combinations of methodologies to apply to the given design problem. To demonstrate its usefulness, we first analyse the concepts and building blocks of two design and engineering methodologies on that basis. Second, we show how these two methodologies, which are based on very similar concepts -- as resulted from the analysis by applying the conceptual framework -- can be combined in order to derive at a complete solution for a given design problem.
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  • Publication
    An Intelligent Supply Chain Design for Improving Delivery Reliability
    (IGI Global, 2012-03-01) ;
    Pinto, Roberto
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    In order to flexibly respond to market demands and changing business environments, today's European machinery and equipment manufacturers are organized in agile, non-hierarchical business networks. As a consequence, relationships with suppliers are often highly volatile, instable and inapprehensible, which in turn causes turbulences with respect to reliability of deliveries. Following the design research paradigm, both practical and knowledge problems are considered by this paper. First, from a practical point of view, a new intelligent supply chain design for non-hierarchical manufacturing networks is developed, that pledges to improve the delivery reliability. Second, from a knowledge point of view, the underlying hypotheses that go along with this new design are validated using structural equation modeling. The results confirm several previously proposed assumptions, including the importance of an electronic procurement process as well as the use of incentive mechanisms for influencing a supplier's delivery reliability.
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    Scopus© Citations 9
  • Publication
    Closing the Loop: Evaluating a Measurement Instrument for Maturity Model Design
    (IEEE Computer Society, 2016) ;
    Epple, Johannes
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    Rothenberger, Marcus
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    Bui, Tung X.
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    Sprague, Ralph H.
    To support the systematic improvement of business intelligence (BI) in organizations, we have designed and refined a BI maturity model (BIMM) and a respective measurement instrument (MI) in prior research. In this study, we devise an evaluation strategy, and evaluate the validity of the designed measurement artifact. Through cluster analysis of maturity assessments of 92 organizations, we identify characteristic BI maturity scenarios and representative cases for the relevant scenarios. For evaluating the designed instrument, we compare its results with insights obtained from in-depth interviews in the respective companies. A close match between our model's quantitative maturity assessments and the maturity levels from the qualitative analyses indicates that the MI correctly assesses BI maturity. The applied evaluation approach has the potential to be re-used in other design research studies where the validity of utility claims is often hard to prove.
    Scopus© Citations 4
  • Publication
    Evaluation of a Business Intelligence Maturity Model: The Reliability Perspective
    (Trauner, 2013-09-11) ;
    Basl, Josef
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    Jasek, Pavel
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    Novotny, Ota
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    Tjoa, A Min
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  • Publication
    Situational Business Intelligence Maturity Models: An Exploratory Analysis
    (IEEE Computer Society, 2013-01-07) ; ;
    Maturity models (MMs) are an established instrument to identify strengths and weaknesses of certain domains. Having constructed such a maturity model for the domain of Business Intelligence (BI) in prior research, we explore the influence of contextual factors on the evolution of BI maturity in organizations in this paper. Therefore, four different BI maturity models were constructed on the basis of two contextual factors company size and environment. Analyzing the four models, we found that both factors strongly affect the evolution of BI maturity in organizations.
    Scopus© Citations 13
  • Publication
    Towards the Measurement of Business Intelligence Maturity
    (Association for Information Systems, 2013-06-05) ; ;
    For the systematic evolution of interdisciplinary socio-technical systems, such as business intelligence (BI), artifacts are needed that comprehensively address multifaceted challenges. To support these strategic improvement initiatives, we proposed a BI maturity model (MM) in prior research. In this paper, we develop an approach to measure maturity of BI in organizations, thereby operationalizing our existing BI MM. In fact, a new maturity measurement instrument is developed that can be used in empirical research. According to the proposed approach, BI maturity can be calculated on the basis of 25 items and organizations are classified into five maturity levels. An exemplary application, using data from 92 organizations, shows that most organizations reside on maturity level three. Furthermore, we investigate the relationship between BI maturity and business benefits of BI. Findings showed that mature organizations have achieved significantly higher business benefits from BI than organizations on lower maturity levels.
  • Publication
    Developing a Collaborative Business Intelligence System for Improving Delivery Reliability in Business Networks
    Since markets are becoming more complex and demanding, manufacturing enterprises are expected to organize along agile business networks in the next years. However, this complex environment often leads to problems with respect to delivery reliability as well as to increased operating expenses for monitoring and controlling suppliers. Based on the design science research paradigm, this paper illustrates the design of a process-centric, collaborative business intelligence system that may help companies in optimizing the reliability of their supplies. In doing so, the architecture as well as the most relevant functionalities of the new IT-artefact is discussed in to more detail. The paper concludes with a brief delineation of the future work and research directions in the area.
  • Publication
    Using Real Options in ERP-Systems for Improving Delivery Reliability
    (AIS Electronic Library (AISeL), 2011-08-04) ; ;
    Hoffmann, Hagen
    Today's machinery and equipment industry is a highly volatile market, giving rise to frequently instable and inapprehensible buyer-supplier-relationships and to turbulences with respect to reliability of deliveries. With this paper we propose a minimal invasive approach how to overcome existing capability limitations in production planning, scheduling and procurement of ERP-systems by using real options as means for coordinating the divergent interest of buyers and suppliers. Following the design research paradigm, we first describe how real options can be integrated in a contemporary ERP-system. In a supplemental evaluation, the attitude toward using this approach is discussed. This final discussion provides insights whether companies in the machinery and equipment industry are willing to adopt our real options approach, or if they prefer the use of other, not necessarily IT-enabled, means for handling the poor delivery reliability.
  • Publication
    Business Intelligence Operational Structures: Towards the Design of a Reference Process Map
    ( 2010-09-17)
    Lahrmann, Gerrit
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    Baars, Henning
    Business intelligence (BI) is often seen as a combined business and IT function. As such, the operational structure of BI is not always clearly defined. In this paper, we present an overview of typical BI operational structures and elaborate their characteristics. Based on this analysis, we will (in future work) design a reference process map for BI which can be used as a template to define organization-specific BI operational structures.
  • Publication
    A Taxonomy of Business Process Management Approaches
    (Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015)
    Bucher, Tobias
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    vom Brocke, Jan
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    Rosemann, Michael
    Both the design and the implementation of the Business Process Management (BPM) concept vary significantly from one organization to another. Organization-specific approaches to BPM are, among other things, influenced by organizational culture as well as by the maturity of the concept’s adoption in the respective organization. This chapter reports on findings from an empirical study and is aimed at answering the question of precisely how organizations deal with the process-oriented management concept – today and in the near future. To address this issue, 38 medium-sized and large organizations from various industries were surveyed. Out of 18 variables used to characterize individual BPM approaches, four distinct design factors of BPM are identified: the degree of process performance measurement, the overall professionalism of process management, the impact of process managers, and the utilization of established methodology and standards. Based on these design factors, four generic approaches to BPM can be differentiated. Furthermore, these results are complemented by an interpolation of this classification into the near future, leading to the differentiation of five BPM project types. This part of the analysis shows that all surveyed organizations strive to increase BPM maturity. There are however significant differences with respect to the particular design of the aspired approaches to mature BPM. The presented results are particularly useful for the engineering and/or adaptation of situational methods in the field of BPM. The chapter therefore concludes with the exemplary adaptation of the ‘process innovation’ method proposed by Davenport with respect to the identified five BPM project types. This adaptation also demonstrates the practical applicability of the presented findings.
    Scopus© Citations 1