Now showing 1 - 10 of 102
  • Publication
    Value Attenuation and Retail Out-of-Stocks : A Service-Dominant Logic Perspective
    (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2014-02-07)
    Ehrenthal, Joachim C.F.
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    Gruen, Thomas W.
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    Purpose - Addresses the effects of retail out-of-stocks from a Service-Dominant (S-D) logic view. Design/methodology/approach - Conceptual, combining classic S-D logic research with recent research of S-D logic in supply chains, and applying this to out-of-stocks in a retail setting of fast-moving consumer goods. Findings - This article unveils out-of-stocks as emergent operant resources that alter and attenuate value creation across manufacturers, retailers, shoppers, users and their networks. It develops a model of value co-creation where manufacturer supply and shopper/user demand meet in the retailer's realm. Differentiating between shopper and user in a sequential model of value creation, it identifies the shopper as an active entity whose response to out-of-stocks redistributes value within the retail service ecosystem. An additional model is developed that illustrates the novel costs of an out-of-stock as uncovered by the S-D logic perspective, allowing retailers and manufacturers to align their interests in improving on-shelf availability. Research limitations/implications - Moving distribution thought and management towards a goal of service provision, this article suggests three logistics research possibilities: retailer-manufacturer misalignment, spatio-temporal supply-demand mismatch, and shopper-user interaction. Practical implications - This article shows how the S-D perspective can bring previously misaligned incentives of supply chain actors into alignment. Previous goods-dominant research showed little common ground for manufacturers and retailers to jointly improve on-shelf availability. The S-D logic view demonstrates compelling rationale for both parties' involvement. Originality/value - Extends S-D logic literature by considering value attenuation through failures in physical distribution and logistics management, adding that non-availability causes operand resources to become operant and attenuate/redistribute value. Extends the out-of-stock literature by providing a theoretical foundation, and by showing the ecosystem effects of out-of-stocks.
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    Scopus© Citations 23
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  • Publication
    Critical factors for sub-supplier management: A sustainable food supply chains perspective
    (Elsevier Science, 2013-12-16) ; ;
    Sarkis, Joseph
    The food industry and its supply chains have significant sustainability implications. Effective supply chain management requires careful consideration of multiple tiers of partners, especially with respect to sustainability issues. Firms increasingly approach their sub-suppliers to drive compliance with social and environmental efforts. A number of complexities and unique challenges make sub-supplier management more difficult than direct supplier management, e.g. a lack of contractual relationships to sub-suppliers, few opportunities to put direct pressure on sub-suppliers, or lack of transparency concerning sub- suppliers' involvement in a focal firm's supply chains. The literature has not investigated, either from sustainability or other perspectives, the critical success factors (CSFs) for firms' sub-supplier manage- ment. Therefore, this study seeks to explore and increase understanding of critical factors that help to overcome the complexities and unique challenges of sub-supplier management, with a focus on the food industry. Using data and information from a year-long field study in two food supply chains, the research identified 14 CSFs that influence the success of sub-suppliers' compliance with corporate sustainability standards (CSS). The identified CSFs can be classified into (1) focal firm-related, (2) relationship-related, (3) supply chain partner-related, and (4) context-related CSFs. The present research expands on the theory of critical success factors by applying the theory to the sustainability and sub-supplier manage- ment context. In support of critical success theory, it was found that CSFs do exist and their management will be necessary for effective sub-supplier management success as highlighted and exemplified by field study insights from practitioners. Multiple research avenues are necessary for further evaluation of sub- supplier management in the food industry and other industries who may find similar issues that arose from the food industry.
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    Scopus© Citations 361
  • Publication
    Institutional entrepreneurship capabilities for interorganizational sustainable supply chain strategies
    (Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2011-06-13)
    Peters, Nils
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    Hoffmann, Volker
    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to address the implementation of proactive interorganizational sustainable supply chain strategies by empirically exploring the relationship between key (inter-)organizational resources of the initiating company and the establishment of widely accepted voluntary sustainability initiatives. Design/methodology/approach - The study is built on comparative case studies as well as literature on institutional entrepreneurship and the resource-based view. Findings - The authors identify capabilities that enable the creation and establishment of company- driven voluntary sustainability initiatives - namely external stakeholder integration, cross-functional integration, the management of loosely coupled business units, supply chain implementation, process improvement and cultural framing. Originality/value - With this study, the authors introduce institutional entrepreneurship theory to supply chain management literature and show that institutional entrepreneurship theory may contribute to the question of how organizations implement their interorganizational sustainable supply chain strategies. Specifically, the study derives propositions for key resources enabling the establishment of voluntary sustainability initiatives widely accepted by participants as well as initiative-external stakeholders
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    Scopus© Citations 80
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    The Relationship Marketing View of the Customer and the Service Dominant Logic Perspective
    (SP Gabler Verlag, 2010-12)
    Gruen, Thomas W.
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    Based on the concept of service-dominant logic as the emerging organizing logic of marketing that would replace the traditional goods-dominant view, Vargo and Lusch (2004) originally proposed that among several other approaches to research and marketing practice that had emerged, relationship marketing would be subsumed by this broader view. More recently, however, Vargo (2009) suggested that because relationship marketing focuses on increasing the series of on-going transactions with a customer, coupled with the goal of enhancing their long- term patronage, that relationship marketing extends the goods-dominant perspective, rather than transcending into the service-dominant logic. This article counters that the relationship marketing view of the customer has already transcended the goods-dominant view to the to service-dominant view based on the way that customers are brought into the relationship as active participants in the service creation, and act as "co-producers" of value. To address the apparent goods-dominant approach in two widely used relationship marketing practices and measures, customer relation- ship management and customer lifetime value, this article proposes that these tools can be used from a goods-dominant view, but they can also serve as essential steps towards the practice of relationship marketing from the service-dominant logic.
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  • Publication
    Assessing the Contribution of ECR
    (Springer, 2006-07-28) ;
    ECR Europe Academic Partnership
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    IBM
    At the first ECR Europe Conference held in Geneva in 1995, the concept of Efficient Consumer Response (ECR) was introduced for the first time to a European audience. At that conference, ECR was defined as a set of improvement initiatives to help grocery retailers and their suppliers to work together to satisfy consumer wishes better, faster and at less cost. the ECR Europe Executive Board asked the ECR Europe Academic Partnership, together with IBM Business Consulting Services, to investigate the status of ECR implementation in Western Europe, ECR adoption patterns and the effects of ECR adoption on retail and consumer goods businesses. In general, the ECR movement is an attempt to re-engineer the consumer goods business as a whole to establish efficient, collaborative, consumer-oriented business processes. In the adoption of ECR in individual companies there are, however, still many obstacles to overcome and much still to learn.
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    Thinking differently about value
    (Springer, 2005)
    Corsten, Daniel
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    Huchzermeier, Arnd
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    Jones, Daniel T.
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    Mitchell, Alan
    ALDI founders Karl and Theo Albrecht would have agreed with Wal-Mart's founder Sam Walton. Walton was obsessed with detail. So were the Albrecht brothers. Walton and his managers knew that there is no magic formula for success, but that numerous small things contribute to it. ALDI shares this conviction: retail is detail: paying attention to all the success factors over decades. ALDI's success is the success of setting voluntary limits. For decades ALDI North kept its product range down to 600 items. At present this figure has presumably grown to 700. Ultimately in retailing, success is not decided by "buying power" and purchasing expertise. It is decided by marketing: the ability to truly focus on customer needs. ALDI could not have achieved its current success without close working relationships with its suppliers. Companies should be capable of developing their own business principles in line with their own cultures. ALDI has succeeded in doing this.
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