Now showing 1 - 10 of 30
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MANY ROADS TO SUCCESS: BROADENING OUR VIEWS OF ACADEMIC CAREER PATHS AND ADVICE

2024 , Beth Livingston , Jamie Gloor , A. K. Ward , Allison S. Gabriel , Joanna T. Campbell , Emily Block , Kimberly French , Rachel Frieder , Annika Hillebrandt , Jia (Jasmine) Hu , Kristen P. Jones , Nina M. Junker , Ashley Mandeville , Sarah Otner , Amanda S. Patel , Samantha Paustian-underdahl , Manuela Priesemuth , Kristen M. Shockley , Mindy Shoss

Advice is often given to junior scholars in the field of organization science to ostensibly facilitate their career success. In this commentary, we discuss insights from 19 elite scholars (i.e., Fellows and top journal editors) about the advice they received—and often, did not follow—throughout their careers. We highlight some of the pitfalls from the current, all-too-common and often singular advice given to junior scholars while also adding necessary nuance to the requirements to achieve success in our field. We conclude with advice on how to give better advice, thereby more equitably encouraging a new generation of increasingly diverse researchers and future professors.

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How identity impacts bystander responses to workplace mistreatment

2023 , Jamie Gloor , Tyler Okimoto , Xinxin Li , Brooke Gazdag , Michelle Ryan

Integrating a social identity approach with Cortina’s (2008) theorizing about selective incivility as modern discrimination, we examine how identification—with an organization, with one’s gender, and as a feminist—shapes bystanders’ interpretations and responses to witnessed incivility (i.e., interpersonal acts of disrespect) and selective incivility (i.e., incivility motivated by targets’ social group membership) towards women at work. We propose that bystanders with stronger organizational identification are less likely to perceive incivility towards female colleagues as discrimination and intervene, but female bystanders with stronger gender identification are more likely to do so. Results from two-wave field data in a cross-lagged panel design (Study 1, N = 336) showed that organizational identification negatively predicted observed selective incivility one year later but revealed no evidence of an effect of female bystanders’ gender identification. We replicated and extended these results with a vignette experiment (Study 2, N = 410) and an experimental recall study (Study 3, N = 504). Findings revealed a “dark side” of organizational identification: strongly identified bystanders were less likely to perceive incivility as discrimination, but there were again no effects of women’s gender identification. Study 3 also showed that bystander feminist identification increased intervention via perceived discrimination. These results raise doubts that female bystanders are more sensitive to recognizing other women’s mistreatment as discrimination, but more strongly identified feminists (male or female) were more likely to intervene. Although strongly organizationally identified bystanders were more likely to overlook women’s mistreatment, they were also more likely to intervene once discrimination was apparent.

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Risqué Business? Interpersonal Anxiety and Humor in the #MeToo Era

2021-10-08 , Gloor, Jamie , Cooper, Cecily , Bowes-Sperry, Lynn , Chawla, Nitya

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The Funny Thing about Robot Leadership…

2020-11-26 , Gloor, Jamie , Lauren, Howe , David, DeCremer , Kai Chi (Sam), Yam

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Critical Events at Critical Times? A Gendered Identity Approach on the Path to (Sustainable) Leadership

2023 , Gloor, Jamie , Rehbock, Stephanie , Kark, Ronit

The early career phase is a key period of identity maintenance and change. But, it is also ripe with important, attention-grabbing occurrences (i.e., critical events) that may modify these processes, particularly influencing women’s leadership pursuit. Because previous research has overlooked if or how such events might alter identifying or if these processes differ for people who identify as men and women, we integrate the identity and critical events literatures to elaborate on how positive and negative critical events may shape men and women’s identifying in the work- and non-work domains over time. We propose that critical events’ effects on identity salience will occur both within and across domains, but that these effects will be stronger within (vs. across) domains. While both positive and negative events can exert negative effects on subsequent identity salience, we propose that the effects of critical events on identity salience may be stronger for women (vs. men). Finally, we connect work identity salience with subsequent leadership status, including contextual moderators that enhance or undermine these effects (i.e., inclusive organizational climate and mega-threats, respectively). We conclude with theoretical and practical implications of this research, including for workforce efficiency and social sustainability. We also highlight calls for future research stemming from our review (e.g., sustainability critical events and gendered analyses for [more] accurate science) as well as fruitful research areas and innovative practices at the work-nonwork interface for professionals on the path to leadership.

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Reducing discrimination against job seekers with and without employment gaps

2023-02 , Kristal, Ariella , Nicks, Leonie , Gloor, Jamie , Hauser, Oliver C.

Past research shows that decision-makers discriminate against applicants with career breaks. Career breaks are common due to caring responsibilities, especially for working mothers, thereby leaving job seekers with employment gaps on their résumés. In a preregistered audit field experiment in the United Kingdom (n = 9,022), we show that rewriting a résumé so that previously held jobs are listed with the number of years worked (instead of employment dates) increases callbacks from real employers compared to résumés without employment gaps by approximately 8%, and with employment gaps by 15%. A series of lab studies (an online pilot and two preregistered experiments; n = 2,650) shows that this effect holds for both female and male applicants—even when compared to applicants without employment gaps—as well as and for applicants with less and more total job experience. The effect is driven by making the applicant’s job experience salient, not as a result of novelty or ease of reading.

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“Maybe Baby?” - The Employment Risk of Potential Parenthood

2021-06-10 , Gloor, Jamie , Okimoto, Tyler G. , King, Eden B.

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Friend or fiend? Disentangling upward humor's (De)stabilizing effects on hierarchies

2023-10 , Jamie Gloor , Niels Van Quaquebeke , Mihwa Seong , Petra Schmid , Christian Alexander Hildebrand , Brad Bitterly , Maurice Schweitzer

Humor research in organizations focuses on leaders' humor, but we know far less about followers' humor. Here, we review and synthesize the scattered work on this "upward humor," offering a novel framing of it as a strategy for followers to deal with hierarchies. We propose a continuum of upward humor from stabilizing (i.e., a friend who uses upward humor to reinforce hierarchies, make hierarchies more bearable or stable) to destabilizing (i.e., a fiend who uses upward humor to question or reshape existing hierarchies) depending on perceived intent (i.e., from benevolent to malicious, respectively) and outline key factors that shape these interpretations. We close with novel questions and methods for future research such as power plays, multi-modal data, and human-robot interactions.

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Cheap talk? Follower sarcasm reduces leader overpay by increasing accountability

2021-09 , Gloor, Jamie

Leaders often engage in costly, self-interested behaviors when they have the power and discretion to do so. Because followers are well-positioned to reduce these behaviors, I test how a specific follower communication—sarcasm expression—affects a particularly costly behavior: leader overpay. In three behavioral experiments and a field study (Ns = 240–526), I test the effect of follower sarcasm on leaders' self-pay. I also test a moderator—leader moral identity—because leaders with low moral identity are more likely to overpay themselves and are more open to social norm violations (including follower sarcasm), as well as a mechanism—leader accountability—because I propose that follower sarcasm decreases leaders' overpay by increasing leaders' perceived accountability. As expected, follower sarcasm reduced leader overpay (vs. the control/no humor and vs. non-sarcastic humor), especially for leaders with weak moral identity. Study 3 replicated these results while showing explicit evidence of the accountability mechanism. Study 4 further supported these ideas with correlational data from real leaders recalling a more (vs. less) sarcastic follower, but only when the sarcasm was publicly (vs. privately) enacted. While talk is cheap, these results show that follower sarcasm can also be valuable, because it reduces leaders' overpay by increasing accountability.

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Don’t Mind the Gap: Reframing Résumés Facilitates Mothers’ Work Re-Entry

2021-08 , Kristal, Ariella , Nicks, Leonie , Gloor, Jamie , Hauser, Oliver

Becoming a mother and taking care-related leaves from work contribute to economic gender inequality: Employers’ gender role stereotypes ascribe mothers less qualification and ambition (i.e., agency), which are reinforced by employment gaps in their résumé. We integrate the judgment and decision-making literature to redesign mothers’ résumés in a way that reduces mothers’ barriers to work re-entry. More specifically, integrating signal detection theory, we theorize that by replacing employment dates with the number of years the applicant worked in each job, applicants can better convey their relevant professional abilities and ambition to employers (i.e., signals) without disclosing these distracting employment gaps (i.e., noise). In a large- scale randomized field experiment (N = 9,022), results showed that mothers with this redesigned resume´ received more callbacks than those whose résumés showed employment dates. In an online experiment (N = 667), we replicated and extended these findings to show explicit evidence of our theorized mechanism: applicant agency. By integrating these literatures, we proposed and tested a cost-free, low-effort intervention to reduce inequality by reducing mothers’ résumé gap- related agency penalties and facilitating their return to work.