Now showing 1 - 7 of 7
  • Publication
    Ladders for Learning: Is Scaffolding the Key to Teaching Problem Solving in Technology-mediated Learning Contexts?
    The success of innovative teaching/learning approaches aiming to foster problem solving in management education depends on useful and easy-to-use IT components in the learning process. However, the complexity of problem solving in self-regulated learning approaches may overwhelm the learner and can lead to unsatisfying learning outcomes. Research suggests the implementation of technology-enhanced scaffolds as a mechanism to guide the learners in their individual problem-solving process to enhance their learning outcomes. We present a theoretical model based on adaptive structuration theory and cognitive load theory that explains how technology-enhanced scaffolding contributes to learning outcomes. We test the model with a fully randomized between-subject experiment in a flipped classroom for management education focusing on individual problem solving. Our results show that technology-enhanced scaffolding contributes significantly to the management of cognitive load as well as to learning process satisfaction and problem-solving learning outcomes. Thereby, our paper provides new conceptual and empirically tested insights for a better understanding of technology-enhanced scaffolds and their design to assist problem solving and its respective effects in flipped classrooms for management education.
    Type:
    Journal:
    Volume:
    Issue:
    Scopus© Citations 37
  • Publication
    Individual Appropriation of Learning Management Systems – Antecedents and Consequences
    IT support in the learning process constitutes a key factor for the success of innovative teaching/learning scenarios. To ensure learning success in innovative teaching/learning scenarios, learners need to faithfully apply learning management systems (LMS). However, we lack theoretical insights into which factors affect whether they do so. To help solve this issue, we first used adaptive structuration theory to identify antecedents and consequences regarding faithful LMS appropriation and embed them into a theoretical model. Second, we conducted a survey study with 173 participants to evaluate the model. The results show that the perceived IT support, interactivity, and the task-technology fit significantly affect the degree to which learners faithfully apply a LMS. Moreover, the results indicate that faithful appropriation is a significant indicator of the learning process satisfaction as well as perceived learning success. The present paper thus theoretically contributes to the scientific discussion concerning technology-mediated learning processes while also making a practical contribution by deriving implications for LMS application.
    Type:
    Journal:
    Volume:
    Issue:
  • Publication
    Towards a Holistic Understanding of Technology-Mediated Learning Appropriation
    IT support in the learning process is one of the key success factors for innovative learning scenarios. A necessary pre-condition is the faithful appropriation of technology-mediated learning (TML) to ensure learning outcomes in innovative learning scenarios. However, information systems research still lacks insights concerning what actually determines a faithful appropriation of TML and little is known about the consequences of a faithful appropriation. In consequence, this research-in-progress paper presents a mixed-methods research approach to gain a holistic understanding of TML appropriation. In a first step, based on the insights of adaptive structuration theory, a theoretical model is developed considering both objective and subjective measures for TML appropriation as well as antecedents and consequences of TML appropriation. In a second step, the mixed-method approach is presented in order to evaluate the theoretical model. Our expected contribution to theory includes an extension of both TML and adaptive structuration theory with an in-depth view of the TML appropriation process, and contributions to practice include the derivation of design implications for TML services that are faithfully appropriated to ensure learning success for TML participants.
  • Publication
    Towards a Holistic Understanding of Technology-mediated Learning Appropriation
    (Association for Information Systems, 2015-12-14) ; ;
    Information technology in the learning process is one major success factor for innovative learning scenarios. A necessary pre-condition is the faithful appropriation of technology-mediated learning (TML) to ensure learning outcomes. However, research still lacks insights concerning determinants and consequences of a faithful TML appropriation. Therefore, this research-in-progress paper presents a mixed-methods research approach to gain a holistic understanding of TML appropriation. First, based on the insights of adaptive structuration theory, a theoretical model is developed considering objective and subjective measures for TML appropriation as well as antecedents and consequences of TML appropriation. Second, the mixed-methods approach is presented in order to evaluate the theoretical model. Our expected contribution to theory includes an extension of both TML and adaptive structuration theory with an in-depth view of TML appropriation. Expected practical contributions include the derivation of design implications for TML services that are faithfully appropriated to ensure learning success of TML participants.
  • Publication
    Examining the Effect of Different Measurements of Learning Success in Technology-mediated Learning Research
    (Association for Information Systems, 2014-12-15) ; ;
    Bitzer, Philipp
    ;
    ;
    Avital, Michel
    ;
    ;
    Schultze, Ulrike
    This paper examines the effects of common method variance with respect to the empirical evaluation of technology mediated learning (TML). We argue that the use of self-reported data for the major dependent variable of TML, learning success, is insufficient and a major validity threat of past research results; thus, we examine the effect of common method variance in TML. We are currently conducting a study on the antecedents of learning success measured by three different approaches. We conduct this study with participants of software trainings and collected data on independent and dependent variables of our research model. In addition, we are provided with the objective learning success measures by the provider of the software training. By analyzing the data we are able to investigate how different measurement approaches to learning success impact research findings. Our research is currently in progress, and therefore we are currently not able to provide any empirical findings. The contribution to theory and practice is an assessment of the reliability of self-reported learning success measures and the impact of different measurement approaches for the relationships in a TML model. Besides the on-going discussion in research regarding the concept of learning success measures, our paper is the first that systematically examines the impact of different measurement approaches for learning success in the light of common method variance in TML research.
  • Publication
    Examining the Effect of Different Measurements of Learning Success in Technology-mediated Learning Research
    (Association for Information Sytems, 2014-12-15) ; ;
    Bitzer, Philipp
    ;
    This research-in-progress paper examines the effects of different measurement methods for learning success with respect to the empirical evaluation of technology-mediated learning (TML). We argue that the use of self-reported data for the major dependent variable of TML, learning success, is insufficient and a major validity threat of past research results; thus, we examine the effect of employed measurement methods in TML against the background of common method variance. We are currently conducting a study on the antecedents of learning success measured by three different approaches that include self-reported learning and objective learning success. By analyzing the data, we are able to investigate how different measurement approaches to learning success impact research findings. Our contribution to theory and practice is an assessment of the validity of self-reported learning success measures and the impact of different measurement approaches for the relationships in a TML model.